How to help sustain our Blue Planet

By Simon Moore & Simon Hoyte

In the wake of Blue Planet II you might be wondering what you can do to have a positive impact on our oceans. How can you help sustain those jumping fish taking birds out of the sky, stop the oceans from rising or the corals from bleaching, and ensure turtles don’t go extinct on our watch?

Leatherback turtle on the beach

If you haven’t been watching (where’ve you been?), David Attenborough has just showcased the incredible life inhabiting our oceans in seven glorious episodes, but under the surface of each story humans are causing damage to the great blue.

It’s easy to feel overwhelmed by the scale of the problems we face with our oceans (and in nature more generally), after all, they’re massive and individual actions feel like just a drop in the ocean. And there’s always plenty more fish in the sea, right? Well, no, not at the rate we’re going.

But there is plenty of reason to have hope – people all across the world are fighting to protect the natural world. And every single person can make an enormous difference, as long as each of us ensures we are part of the solution and not part of the problem.

Here are five easy things you can do to make a positive difference to help sustain our Blue Planet:

  1. Use less plastic! Refuse plastic as much as possible, and avoid plastic straws, microbeads, disposable plastic bottles and plastic-wrapped vegetables
  2. Know your seafood! Ensure your food is sourced sustainably through Marine Stewardship Council certification, and buy food locally where you can see exactly how it’s produced
  3. Fight climate change! One of the easiest ways to do this is to eat less meat and animal products, but also walk more, use public transport, fly less, improve your household energy efficiency and switch to a renewable energy supplier
  4. Support good conservation charities! Join and donate to campaigns by organisations such as SeaShepherd, Greenpeace and Fauna & Flora International, who devote their lives to defending the seas and the wider natural world
  5. Vote and get active! Vote for people who share your concern for the environment, tell your MP what you care about, join communities of likeminded individuals and try to promote conservation issues however and wherever you can

This article also appears on Simon Hoyte’s blog Hunt and Gather

Photo by JuliasTravels


Wildscreen Festival 2016

Every two years experts from the wildlife and nature documentary industry come together in Bristol for Wildscreen Festival – a chance to share ideas, collaborate, and view each other’s work. I was invited along for BlueSci Magazine and reported on the festival, which you can check out on the BlueSci website. In particular I evaluate the two different broad aims apparent in wildlife films: pure entertainment vs. environmental activism.


Hope you enjoy the read:

Why do we need the EU (or UN)?

I am absolutely not an expert on European politics, or UN politics, but I do have a very good idea why we need large institutions and collectives, that bring countries and people together for common good. You can probably already guess what that is – we need them to facilitate cooperation instead of conflict.

We’re a social species that relies heavily on both relatives and strangers from within our group to survive, reproduce and thrive – it takes a village to raise a child. Where would any one couple be without the vast support network that the rest of society provides? Think midwives, farmers, teachers, doctors.

It is human nature to separate things, including social groups, into in-groups and out-groups. We rely on others around us, and form strong bonds with people inside our social groups whom we cooperate with, protect and sometimes even fight alongside. This comes in stark contrast with groups outside of our network – out-groups – whom we find ourselves strongly disliking, avoiding, fearing, competing with, sometimes fighting, but maybe occasionally trading with. This phenomenon is called xenophobia – fear of that which is foreign or strange – and it is shared to some degree by every one of our species.

What’s this got to do with the European Union? Well the easiest way to overcome xenophobia, and facilitate cooperation between rival groups, or countries, is to bring them together and make them feel part of a bigger whole. If we can agree upon a common identity, common goals, common values and common rights, eventually people will start feeling like they’re part of something bigger, and that ‘others’ are allies, not enemies.

Today, humans face problems that have no respect for country borders. These problems span the climate, the oceans, the river systems and the land, and they affect every single country on this planet. For too long, we have been competing and battling amongst ourselves, and polluting the environment that we depend on so utterly and completely. It’s high time we recognized that we are all in this together, and that we must all help one another if we are to survive the upcoming trials the climate and the planet will throw at us.

Only by seeing each and every other individual on this planet as one of our own – as a member of our group – do we stand a chance of cooperating on the enormous scale required. This requires understanding, compassion, empathy, and a strong sense of what binds us together as human beings.

I don’t claim to know everything about the European Union, or the United Nations, and like every man-made institution they have their significant flaws. But we’ve created global problems that require global solutions. These can only be tackled by the 7 billion of us working together as one body, with one shared vision. I feel that we desperately need to utilize organizations like the EU and UN if we are to have any success in combating the global issues we have brought upon ourselves. We must work collectively. We must unite. We must Remain.

EU Newspaper Clipping
Cambridge News 20th June 2016

The BlueSi Radio Show

BlueSci Radio logoI’ve taken on the role of Head of Radio for BlueSci, a science communication society at the University of Cambridge. We have a different guest on every week and discuss their research and a bunch of other science that takes our interest – hopefully it will take yours!

There’s two ways to listen:

– On the BlueSci website here

– On the iTunes Podcasts app – just search ‘BlueSci’ and hit Subscribe

Hope you enjoy,


Simon Moore, Tom Jameson & Simon Hoyte after recording Ep 8
Simon Moore, Tom Jameson & Simon Hoyte after recording Ep 8

Passionate Conservation

People drive conservation and environmental efforts, and their personality and style of interaction can have a big effect on the strength of the message they’re trying to communicate. I’ve recently noticed the stark contrast between active and passive speakers on these subjects. Active speakers aren’t afraid of ruffling feathers; in fact they strive to do so! They wish to enrage enough people with their facts and accusations to inspire an army of activists to take up the fight. Sometimes they may overemphasize the facts or make unfounded allegations, but they are driven by an incredible passion to make a difference.

On the other hand, passive speakers often adopt the less aggressive approach of letting the facts speak for themselves. They are usually less inclined towards bold statements, and leave you with ‘food for thought’ rather than suggestions for direct action to take today. Passive speakers may be equally passionate, but their personalities stop them from being too rash and outspoken. Sometimes the passive approach can be very effective, but it has the danger of leaving an audience feeling pessimistic about the situation, or confused at the speaker’s lack of personal concern.

Brian May

Brian May, founder of wildlife charity Save Me, is a great example of a passionate conservationist.

In our present state of environmental crisis, we can’t afford to sit back and quietly pass on the message that we’re destroying our planet!! We need to shove it down people’s throats and shake people into action. The time for a calm, measured response has gone – we’re in dire straits and we need people to appreciate the severity of the situation.


If you have a conservation message to tell and you think it’s pretty damn important, don’t leave your emotions and passion out of it – use them to highlight the severity of the situation.

Racing Extinction

Last week I had the privilege to attend a Discovery Channel film screening at the London Zoo (thanks John Cousins). The main event: Racing Extinction, a documentary about the illegal trade in endangered wildlife, and the mass extinction that humans are driving at this very moment. Wondering if it matters if species are going extinct? Read this.


The director’s last documentary, The Cove, won an Oscar and opened people’s eyes to the slaughter of dolphins that goes on in Japan. This new piece is similarly harrowing – investigative journalism with a very important message. It’s a must-see if you’re at all concerned about the fate of life on this planet.


You can see Racing Extinction on Wednesday 2nd December at 9pm, your local time, on the Discovery Channel.


Animals Behind Bars

elephant locked up

Is it fair to capture wild animals and keep them in captivity for our entertainment?


We lock many animals into tiny cages or swimming pools despite their clear intelligence, emotions and self-awareness. Dolphins, chimpanzees, elephants and killer whales are just a handful of animals that can certainly find captivity as stressful and horrific as would you or I. Imagine being in the Truman Show but confined to a small house, with strange things staring into your windows, laughing and flashing bright lights at you. Even tapping the glass in the hopes that you’ll move or do something interesting.

OrcaKiller whales locked up at SeaWorld. Watch the documentary Blackfish on netflix and see how corporations like SeaWorld lie and cover up their mistreatment of orcas and their own trainers.


Maybe we should draw a line and only allow lower, less complex and intelligent animals to be kept in zoos and aquariums; animals which don’t have the cognitive capacity to feel the emotional trauma of being locked up. Ignoring for a moment the difficulties of making such a distinction, would it be fair to give different rights to different animals? Shouldn’t all animals have an equal right to live freely in their natural environment?

Well we already apply animal rights differently across species. For example in scientific and medical research there is a hierarchy of increasingly strict test regulations through from plants to insects to mammals to primates and finally to humans.

A complicated grey area comes when considering if we can or should be allowed to own an animal. Perhaps you could argue ownership is merely an asymmetric symbiosis, where both parties benefit (the owner by using the other, and the owned by being looked after and protected). But in each scenario with zoos and domestic livestock, the animals don’t have a say in the matter, they’re under lock and key.

I’m not a vegetarian, but I do care deeply about animal welfare. I think that for domesticated animals, agriculture is their natural environment, so I don’t have a problem as long as their welfare is ensured. Many animals have been changed so drastically through selective breeding that they are no longer adapted to a wild home. That being said, it’s very clear that we’re simply using and exploiting these animals, hence why I believe their wellbeing and fair treatment is absolutely crucial.

When it comes to animals at zoos and aquariums, there are some non-selfish justifications for keeping them. There is potential for preventing extinctions by having animals in captivity, but really most effort should be in protecting the species in its wild habitat. Another possible benefit of zoos is their outreach and inspiration for the general public. It may be that an encounter with captive animals increases people’s willingness to support their conservation in the wild.

I’ve been to zoos, as you probably have too, and it is quite extraordinary to be able to see amazing creatures up close and personal. The cultural value they provide us, when they’re managed and designed well, is priceless. Whether or not this is worth the psychological suffering of some of the animals we’re viewing is debatable. Unfortunately, I think zoos also propagate the false sense of entitlement and dominance that our species has over the rest of our planet, which has led to our destruction of the natural world. It’s hard to see animals as our equals when every animal except us is locked up. Perhaps adding a caged Homo sapiens exhibit would start to rectify the situation.

Homo sapiens zoo exhibitZagreb Zoo in Croatia allows people to enter a Homo sapiens exhibit. The idea is there but they fail to get the whole message across, as they let people leave at will.


Meat and the Environment

The meat industry is an enormous contributor to greenhouse gases and climate change. Plus it requires very large areas of land for production – tens of times more land (not to mention water and energy) than the equivalent weight of plant based food. In our rapidly developing world there is a growing demand for meat which is causing greater CO2 emissions and greater pressure to increase land available for agriculture, which typically comes at the expense of biodiverse forests, leading to further climate change. A simple way we can choose to combat this is by reducing the amount of meat and animal products in our diet. I love meat as much as the next person, but I love our planet even more!


Meat in Moderation.


Hometree fallingHometree burningPristine forests being destroyed to allow the exploitation of mineral resources in the poignantly environmental film Avatar. Director, James Cameron urges “You cannot claim to be an environmentalist if you’re still eating meat and dairy”.