Passionate Conservation

People drive conservation and environmental efforts, and their personality and style of interaction can have a big effect on the strength of the message they’re trying to communicate. I’ve recently noticed the stark contrast between active and passive speakers on these subjects. Active speakers aren’t afraid of ruffling feathers; in fact they strive to do so! They wish to enrage enough people with their facts and accusations to inspire an army of activists to take up the fight. Sometimes they may overemphasize the facts or make unfounded allegations, but they are driven by an incredible passion to make a difference.

On the other hand, passive speakers often adopt the less aggressive approach of letting the facts speak for themselves. They are usually less inclined towards bold statements, and leave you with ‘food for thought’ rather than suggestions for direct action to take today. Passive speakers may be equally passionate, but their personalities stop them from being too rash and outspoken. Sometimes the passive approach can be very effective, but it has the danger of leaving an audience feeling pessimistic about the situation, or confused at the speaker’s lack of personal concern.

Brian May

Brian May, founder of wildlife charity Save Me, is a great example of a passionate conservationist.

In our present state of environmental crisis, we can’t afford to sit back and quietly pass on the message that we’re destroying our planet!! We need to shove it down people’s throats and shake people into action. The time for a calm, measured response has gone – we’re in dire straits and we need people to appreciate the severity of the situation.

 

If you have a conservation message to tell and you think it’s pretty damn important, don’t leave your emotions and passion out of it – use them to highlight the severity of the situation.

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2 thoughts on “Passionate Conservation

  1. I agree that the time for inaction has passed, but it is possible to combine the two approaches to get an audience engaged without distorting claims about the environment. The situation is dire enough that clearly presented facts, communicated alongside measurable steps the average person can take, can inspire people to change for the better

    1. I totally agree, getting the facts straight is hugely important. And obviously the best possible message combines passion with inscrutable science. I just wanted to highlight the power of an enthusiastic as opposed to dreary/bland delivery of conservation.

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