Major Lessons In Human Evolution

Major Transitions In Human Evolution
The Royal Society, London Major Transitions conference

I recently attended this fantastic conference on human evolution but the key question it left me thinking was: What’s the point?

Don’t get me wrong, I love the study of human evolution and have great respect for those doing it, but it just seems to me like they’re missing a trick. They seem to overlook the fact that our environment is in a state of crisis, and fail to link their work to the bigger picture in a way that could help promote environmentalist attitudes.

Improving our knowledge of the details of human evolution is necessary, but, more urgently, we need to increase engagement of the general public with the fundamental lessons this field has to offer. Currently, many people misunderstand our evolutionary past, or worse: remain unconvinced that we even evolved. So I think much work needs to be done to improve this state of affairs, so that we can effectively spread the message that humans are not special, and that we evolved just like any other creature on Earth.

Homocentric worldviews

We’ve evolved to be so homocentric that the question of our own origins is of great interest to everyone.

tree-magnified

We must take modesty from our shared evolutionary origins, and understand that all other species are no less important than our own!

A selection of top paleoanthropologists, archaeologists and paleoclimatologists presented their cutting edge research at the conference last week, yet they all failed to acknowledge the key lessons I think we must take from their studies. They totally ignored the immense issues facing our (and every other) species today, despite the great relevance of their research. I believe an appreciation of our humble origins and connection to the rest of life could help spark a much-needed global conservation movement.

Many messages were given to the younger generation that it’s an exciting time to be in science, urging us to continue their work in expanding the fossil record. While I’m sure it’s greatly interesting, I believe we’d be better served trying to link our understanding of evolutionary history with moral lessons for our rather pressing future. We need to promote a modest-evolutionary and pro-environmental ethic that might give our deteriorating planet and biodiversity some chance at survival.

 

This is my call to the many brilliant scientists working in the field of human evolution:

Explicitly link your work to current environmental issues by encouraging a little modesty in evaluating our position and role within life on Earth.

Sincerely,

Simon Moore
University of Cambridge

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